I wish I had someone to talk to.

thesonicscrew:

jackhawksmoor:

slytherliz:

lixxieb:

doc-knock:

londonprophecy:

qweety:

just this guy’s laugh

OMFG

holy shit i’m crying ngl

That should not have been as funny as it was!

OH MY WORD

GRAB THE TARP GRAB IT

"they have angered the machine!!"

I’m genuinely in pain from laughing

curiositycounts:

A history of Earth in 24 hours   (via)

Just singing to the cats.

The song is The Breeze by Dr.Dog

katelyn-sensible:


Trailer Park Boys: Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys (2008)

Relationship goals.
katelyn-sensible:


Trailer Park Boys: Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys (2008)

Relationship goals.
katelyn-sensible:


Trailer Park Boys: Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys (2008)

Relationship goals.
katelyn-sensible:


Trailer Park Boys: Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys (2008)

Relationship goals.
katelyn-sensible:


Trailer Park Boys: Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys (2008)

Relationship goals.

katelyn-sensible:

Trailer Park Boys: Say Goodnight to the Bad Guys (2008)

Relationship goals.

haaaaaaaaave-you-met-ted:

j-willikers:

wicked-mint-leaves:

kateevangelistaauthor:

This is SO cool that I just had to share.

you clever fuckers

my teacher used this today

W+H+I+S+K+E+Y
23+8+9+19+11+5+25 = 100%

image

panicnome:

There are two kinds of people; those who love Farscape, and those who have yet to discover it.

cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.
cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.
cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.
cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.
cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.
cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.
cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.

cubebreaker:

Japan’s Nabana no Sato Botanical Garden used over 7,000,000 LED lights to create this amazing tribute to nature featuring displays of rainbows, auroras, and Mt. Fuji.

adessive:

Be Born Again, Dr. Kim

humanoidhistory:

SUPERMOON!! — Tonight brings us another supermoon. Here’s a little explainer from NASA/APOD: “What is so super about tomorrow’s supermoon? Tomorrow, a full moon will occur that appears slightly larger and brighter than usual. The reason is that the Moon’s fully illuminated phase occurs within a short time from perigee - when the Moon is its closest to the Earth in its elliptical orbit. Although the precise conditions that define a supermoon vary, given one definition, tomorrow’s will be the third supermoon of the year — and the third consecutive month that a supermoon occurs. One reason supermoons are popular is because they are so easy to see — just go outside and sunset and watch an impressive full moon rise! Since perigee actually occurs today, tonight’s sunset moonrise should also be impressive. Pictured above, a supermoon from 2012 is compared to a micromoon — when a full Moon occurs near the furthest part of the Moon’s orbit — so that it appears smaller and dimmer than usual. Given many definitions, at least one supermoon occurs each year, with the next being 2015 August 30.”
Images from astrophotographers Catalin Paduraru and Jerry Lodriguss.
humanoidhistory:

SUPERMOON!! — Tonight brings us another supermoon. Here’s a little explainer from NASA/APOD: “What is so super about tomorrow’s supermoon? Tomorrow, a full moon will occur that appears slightly larger and brighter than usual. The reason is that the Moon’s fully illuminated phase occurs within a short time from perigee - when the Moon is its closest to the Earth in its elliptical orbit. Although the precise conditions that define a supermoon vary, given one definition, tomorrow’s will be the third supermoon of the year — and the third consecutive month that a supermoon occurs. One reason supermoons are popular is because they are so easy to see — just go outside and sunset and watch an impressive full moon rise! Since perigee actually occurs today, tonight’s sunset moonrise should also be impressive. Pictured above, a supermoon from 2012 is compared to a micromoon — when a full Moon occurs near the furthest part of the Moon’s orbit — so that it appears smaller and dimmer than usual. Given many definitions, at least one supermoon occurs each year, with the next being 2015 August 30.”
Images from astrophotographers Catalin Paduraru and Jerry Lodriguss.

humanoidhistory:

SUPERMOON!! — Tonight brings us another supermoon. Here’s a little explainer from NASA/APOD: “What is so super about tomorrow’s supermoon? Tomorrow, a full moon will occur that appears slightly larger and brighter than usual. The reason is that the Moon’s fully illuminated phase occurs within a short time from perigee - when the Moon is its closest to the Earth in its elliptical orbit. Although the precise conditions that define a supermoon vary, given one definition, tomorrow’s will be the third supermoon of the year — and the third consecutive month that a supermoon occurs. One reason supermoons are popular is because they are so easy to see — just go outside and sunset and watch an impressive full moon rise! Since perigee actually occurs today, tonight’s sunset moonrise should also be impressive. Pictured above, a supermoon from 2012 is compared to a micromoon — when a full Moon occurs near the furthest part of the Moon’s orbit — so that it appears smaller and dimmer than usual. Given many definitions, at least one supermoon occurs each year, with the next being 2015 August 30.”

Images from astrophotographers Catalin Paduraru and Jerry Lodriguss.

ryanpanos:

Highrise of Holmes | James Wines
ryanpanos:

Highrise of Holmes | James Wines
ryanpanos:

Highrise of Holmes | James Wines
ryanpanos:

Highrise of Holmes | James Wines

ryanpanos:

Highrise of Holmes | James Wines

How Long Must I Wait
Dr.Dog

francesfalls:

Oh soul of mine, look out and see the time that is to be - How long must I wait?

space-pics:

Long Exposure Photo of tonight’s Falcon 9 rocket launch from Cape Canaveral, carrying AsiaSat 6 to Geostationary Transfer Orbit [4256x2832]
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/